Articles by thisisknit

You are currently browsing thisisknit’s articles.

Ok, we can’t keep this all to ourselves any longer. We’ve got exciting news, and we can’t wait to tell you! Tin Can Knits is coming to This Is Knit, to give not one, but two workshops!

We’ve featured a lot of her designs here, because they’re simply some of the best patterns we know. There’s the Snowflake jumper above (Maria and Jen made one each), and there’s Bonny, which Jacqui whipped up in no time.

And back at Christmas, one of our bestselling kits was the Gothic Cowl:

Thing is, we’re not sure of the date yet, but it’s looking like a weekend date in June, and there’ll be two half day workshops, on different topics. And the best way to find out all the details as soon as we do? Follow us on twitter, where we’re @ThisIsKnit, and keep an eye on this blog. Places will be limited and first-come-first-served, and our booking page will be the place to nab your reservation!

We’re heading into St Patrick’s Weekend, so we’d like to wish you all, at home and abroad, a terrific time. We’ll be closed on Tuesday March 17th itself, but open as usual right through the weekend!

Now, we’re being cautious about this, but in the last day or so, it’s feeling a bit like spring. The days are noticeably longer, and there’s flowers appearing, and it’s Daffodil Day at the end of the month.

And right on cue, this cowl appeared in the shop. As bright as any daffodil, with lots of simple beading, it’s the Jeweled Cowl, a free pattern that’s perfect for pretty laceweight. It’s such a simple pattern: literally a single page of instructions, and made entirely of knit stitches. If you’re looking for an easy project for trying out the terrific beading technique we blogged on Tuesday, there’s no better pattern.

Our Jeweled Cowl is made in gorgeous Juniper Moon Findley, and took just over half a skein. A 50/50 merino/silk blend, it’s a joy to work with and to wear.

One for yourself? One as a gift? Either would be perfect.

Our friends in The Garden helped us out with the daffodils for this post – we really do have the very best neighbours. Their spring flowers, clustered round the grand South William Street door of the Powerscourt Centre, are just lovely. Fancy a glimpse? With pleasure…

Adding beads to knitting makes for really beautiful finished objects. For instance, just look at WittyKnitty’s wedding shawl above. There’s two distinct ways of doing it – prethreading the beads onto the yarn before you start, as our Party Lace Scarf does, or adding them to individual stitches as you work.

The second technique means you can dive straight into the knitting. One way of doing it involves a teeny-tiny crochet hook, one both small enough to fit through the bead and large enough to hook the yarn. There’s no doubt this can be fiddly, and there’s always a certain number of beads in a packet with a hole just too small for the hook. So we’re terribly happy to report that there’s another way to bead your stitches, and we’ve got a tutorial for you!

There’s a type of dental floss on the market called Super Floss. It was previously available in North America only, but now it’s in Ireland too, costing just a couple of euro. Its special feature is that it comes precut into 30cm lengths, and both ends are handily stiffened.

When you have your strand of floss (and our small packet contains fifty strands), start by threading on one bead. In the picture below, you can see how the stiffened end helps. The floss essentially becomes its own beading needle.

Tie a quick knot around this first bead with one end of the floss so the beads can’t fall off. From now on, we’ll call this end the knotted end, and the other end the free end. Thread on some more beads from the free end. You don’t have to thread a lot at a time – you can always add some more as you go. Then knit across your row until you reach the stitch you want to place a bead on. You can see the beads waiting their turn in the background of this picture.

Take up the strand of beaded floss and move the last bead that you threaded – the furthest one from the knotted end – up towards the free end, close to the knitting.

Poke the free end of the floss through the stitch. The stiffening makes this easy.

With the bead close to the knitting, take up the free end of the floss…

…and pass it back up through your bead in the other direction.

Now you can slip the stitch off the needle (the floss is holding it so it can’t drop)…

…and move the bead down from the floss onto the stitch.

Pop the stitch back up onto the left hand needle and pull the floss out gently.

Then you just work the stitch as usual, and the bead stays firmly put.

And that’s it. We find it far handier than the crochet hook method, with less risk of catching only part of the yarn and less wastage of beads.

Dental floss. It’s not just for teeth!

On Tuesday we mentioned how much delight we get from seeing your finished objects. Well, you can imagine our glee when one of our customers came into the shop with a bag full of these beauties. We thought you’d like to see them too, so we begged her for pictures to show you.

Above, you can see her Life Cycle Baby Blanket. By now it’s been sent off to fulfil its purpose, keeping a tiny person all snug, so we were lucky to get to see it. The knitting is beautiful, and the combination of Malabrigo Sock in Ochre and Laura Nelkin‘s pattern is perfect – what an heirloom to keep generations of babies cozy.

Next to appear was a Clarus Shawl, in Coolree Yarns Merino/Silk fingering (the colour’s Ocean Green). It’s another Laura Nelkin pattern, too.

And finally, we got to admire Catherine’s first lace shawl, Skywalker, and what a début it is.

By now, you won’t be surprised that Laura Nelkin designed this too – that’s some recommendation for her work! This is also made in Coolree Yarns Merino/Silk, in This Is Knit’s exclusive Inkwell colourway.

Catherine, thank you so much for letting us feature your gorgeous lace. It’s a real treat, and we can’t wait to see what you make next!

Here’s a spectacular finished object, knitted by Jaclyn Allen, a good friend of This Is Knit. It’s from Boo Knits’ gorgeous Wintersweet pattern, which comes as no surprise: stunning lace, lots of beading!

This example is made from Juniper Moon Findley laceweight, and the colour is Hyacinth. At a generous 730 metres a ball, there’s more than enough to knit Wintersweet, which takes just 550.

Our very favourite thing is seeing the yarn comes back to visit when it’s become your projects. Thank you, Jaclyn!

Love’s labours won

Pembroke

Our Valentines Competition was huge fun. We’re always amazed at your inventiveness, and we’re still giggly and touched by the entries. You can see them all here!

In case you missed it on twitter and facebook, the winner was Sinéad, getting in with less than an hour to go before the 14th, with a very up-to-the-minute entry:

I love you much more than knitting colours all day,
Though I hear there’s some fun in just shades of Grey,
So wrap me head to toe in softest Pembroke,
And maybe I’ll give you that “come hither” look.

Congratulations, Sinéad – we can’t wait to see what you make with your gorgeous Pembroke Silk! And keep an eye out for our next competition – we love them so much, there’s bound to be another one soon!

We’ve been talking a lot about pompoms recently, and one question keeps coming up: what’s the best way of attaching one securely to a hat? Well, we had an intriguing suggestion tweeted at us recently, so we resolved to try it out.

It’s very simple, and that picture shows it in practice. Instead of just sewing the pompom to the hat fabric, sew it to a button on the wrong side of the hat. The button, nestling into the top of the hat, distributes the pulling of the pompom and makes it much less likely to come loose. You’ll find our tutorial on sewing on buttons at this link.

So yes, it works!

Together

In the last month or so, there’s been a delightful surge in impromptu Knit-Alongs. Through twitter or facebook, or from this blog, people get inspired and before you know it, there’s starting together and working through and gleeful sharing of finished objects all over the place.

We’ve seen the Epistropheid phenomenon, and there’s still a lot of Il Grande Favoritos in progress, and now there’s another one. Started by Carol Feller on her blog, here’s another pair, both cardigans. A lot of people are casting on Talamh, but there’s also a whole lovely set of Ravis. You see, Ravi is one of our very favourite things…

…not only the adult version, but also Ravi Junior, the clever, stylish and frankly faster child’s version:


Image © Eimear Earley (deimne on Ravelry); used with permission.

And here’s Jen’s sunshiny yellow version, with the best buttons ever!

Over on Ravelry, there’s pages and pages of practical support from Carol, as well as other knitters, on the February 2015 Mini KAL thread. So why not leap into the fun?

We’re amazed at the response to our Valentine’s Competition – reading your entries makes us smile so much.

So here’s a suggestion to enter if you haven’t done so yet, and a reminder that you can enter as often as you like. The prize is a skein of stunning Townhouse Pembroke Silk, which is the yarn in the Heaven Scent shawl up above. We’ll pick a winner on February 14th, so there’s three more days to go!

Now, who’s got a rhyme for “Pembroke”?

You know those patterns that make you want to drop everything and cast on? Well, this is one of those, so we did. There’s currently five of these gorgeous jumpers either finished or in progress among our staff, and we reckon there’s going to be a lot more.

It’s called Il Grande Favorito, and it’s the softest, comfiest thing you can imagine. It’s fast and easy, knitted from the top down with a touch of short row shaping on the back. The garter stitch front contrasts so elegantly with the plain stocking stitch back and sleeves.

It’s designed for sportweight, so Lisa hit on the excellent plan of combining Debbie Bliss Baby Cashmerino (dozens of colours, from dramatic to pastel) with a toning shade of Fyberspates Cumulus, holding a strand of each together all the way through. As you can see, the result is a fabric that’s both substantial and hazy:

No surprise, then, that this has become our favourite thing, and we wouldn’t be at all surprised if it became one of ours too!

« Older entries § Newer entries »